About

The Book of Common Prayer states that sacraments are “outward and visible signs” of an “inward and spiritual grace”.

This is a blog about those outward and visible signs of God’s grace that are present in everyday life; the places between light and dark, faith and doubt, joy and pain.

My name is Connor Gwin.

I’m an Episcopal priest serving as the Canon for Engagement and Formation in the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia. I will begin work as the Chaplain at Stuart Hall School in July 2018.

I enjoy writing, reading poetry, and playing with my 12-year-old rescue dog, Jackson.

jackson

My wife Emma and I are moving to Staunton, Virginia very soon where we will welcome our first child to the world.

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Follow me on Twitter (@RevConnorGwin).

3 Comments

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  1. Loved your presentation at lynchburg convocation! Best of luck! Will be praying for you!

  2. Stacy Peterson June 11, 2016 — 8:48 pm

    I read The Ubiquity of Grief on Mockingbird. It was just wonderful. According to my math you’re only 26, is that possible?? So bright and deep and learned to be such a young fellow. And far too young to have lost both parents, so sorry about that. I too read that book about tidying up and dialoguing a great deal with your belongings so your mention made me laugh. I just couldn’t do that – maybe that’s why it didn’t work for me. But the paragraph where you talk about grieving never stopping, grieving the shattered expectations for our lives – I have a progressive movement disorder and every few years I incur a new loss and have something new to grieve. One year I can’t drink from a cup all of a sudden, the next year I can’t put my lipstick on. All of a sudden people are asking me if I need help and I hate that. My sister and brother and I had a falling out a few years ago over family money, such a little bit of money… Now no one’s speaking to anyone. So sad, so unnecessary. And many other hurts of life. But if I did not have my belief in God I would be utterly lost, and with it I have hope and a great deal of it, and joy as well. Thank you for such a excellent article.

  3. I read The Ubiquity of Grief on Mockingbird. It was just wonderful. According to my math you’re only 26, is that possible?? So bright and deep and learned to be such a young fellow. And far too young to have lost both parents, so sorry about that. I too read that book about tidying up and dialoguing a great deal with your belongings so your mention made me laugh. I just couldn’t do that – maybe that’s why it didn’t work for me. But the paragraph where you talk about grieving never stopping, grieving the shattered expectations for our lives – I have a progressive movement disorder and every few years I incur a new loss and have something new to grieve. One year I can’t drink from a cup all of a sudden, the next year I can’t put my lipstick on. All of a sudden people are asking me if I need help and I hate that. My sister and brother and I had a falling out a few years ago over family money, such a little bit of money… Now no one’s speaking to anyone. So sad, so unnecessary. And many other hurts of life. But if I did not have my belief in God I would be utterly lost, and with it I have hope and a great deal of it, and joy as well

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